7 Workouts You Can Do At Home
7 Workouts You Can Do At Home

7 Workouts You Can Do At Home

Workouts At Home

There are several advantages to exercising in the comfort of one’s own home. The benefits of exercising at home include the freedom to exercise whenever you choose, the simplicity of finding a regimen that works for your schedule, and the lack of concern about what you are wearing.

Many individuals believe that working out at home is difficult because they do not have access to a gym or the financial means to purchase pricey equipment. However, there are several methods to work out at home without the need for any equipment. You may do resistance workouts using everyday things such as chairs, sofa cushions, and towels, or you can go outdoors and sprint up stairs!

To remain active and healthy, here are some activities you may perform at home to keep yourself in good shape:

Superman

Step 1

Lie down on a yoga mat prone (on your stomach) with your legs extended, ankles slightly plantarflexed (toes pointing away from your shins), and arms extended above with palms facing each other in the beginning position. Relax your neck and line your cranium with your spine.

Step 2

Phase 1: Exhale, tense your abdominal and core muscles to stabilize your spine, and gently extend both hips (lift both legs) a few inches off the floor while elevating both arms a few inches off the floor at the same time. Maintain full extension in both the legs and the arms, and prevent any rotation in either. Avoid any arching of your back or elevating of your head while maintaining your torso and head posture. Hold this posture for a limited period of time.

Step 3

Lowering Your Legs and Arms Back Towards Your Beginning Posture: Gently inhale and slowly lower your legs and arms back towards your starting position without making any movement in your low back or hips.

Push-ups

Push-ups

Step 1

Kneel on an exercise mat or the floor with your feet together behind you in the starting position (see illustration).

Step 2

Slowly lean forward to rest your palms flat on the mat, with your hands shoulder-width apart and your fingers pointing forward or slightly inward. Repeat this motion with your other hands. Slowly transfer your weight forward until your shoulders are exactly over your hands, then reverse the process. Make any necessary adjustments to your hands to enable the complete extension of your body without any bend at the hips or knees. Stiffen your torso by tightening your core/abdominal muscles (“bracing”), as well as your glute and quadriceps muscles, and align your head with the rest of your spinal column. Place your feet together, with your ankles dorsiflexed, and your legs together (toes pointed towards your shins).

Step 3

Slowly lower your body towards the floor while keeping a tight torso and head that are aligned with your spine. Downward Phase: During this downward phase, avoid allowing your low back to droop or your hips to rise over your heart level. Continue to lower yourself until your chest or chin comes into contact with the mat or the floor. During the lowering phase, you should allow your elbows to flare outwards.

Step 4

During the upward phase, you should maintain a solid torso and head that are aligned with your spine by pressing upwards via your arms. Consider pushing the floor away from you to build up more strength. Allowing your low back to droop or your hips to rise upwards is not recommended. Hold the position for as long as it takes to completely extend the arms at the elbows.

Step 5

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An alternate posture is to turn your hands so that they face forwards and maintain your elbows close to your sides throughout the downward part of the movement. By doing so, the attention is shifted away from the chest muscles and onto the triceps, which may help to relieve tension on the shoulder joint.

Pushing through your heel and the outer surface of your palm increases the power of your push while also providing more stability to your shoulders.

Contralateral Limb Raises

Step 1

The starting position is to lie down on the ground (on your stomach) with your legs extended, ankles slightly plantar flexed (toes pointed toward each other), arms extended above with palms facing each other, and legs extended again. Relax your neck and line your cranium with your spine.

Step 2

Upward Phase: Take a deep breath and engage your abdominal/core muscles to stabilize your spine. Gently lift one arm a few inches off the floor, keeping your arm extended and preventing any rotation in your arm. Downward Phase: Take a deep breath and slowly lower one arm a few inches off the floor. Avoid any arching of your back or elevating of your head while maintaining your torso and head posture. Hold this posture for a limited period of time.

Step 3

Downward Phase: Take a deep breath in and slowly drop your arm back towards your starting position, keeping your low back and hips as still as possible.

Step 4

As you begin, contract your abdominal and core muscles to help maintain spinal stability as you slowly raise one hip (one leg) a few inches off the floor, keeping your leg extended, ankle plantarflexed (toes pointing away from your thighs), and trying to avoid any rotation in your leg. Avoid any arching of your back or elevating of your head while maintaining your torso and head posture. For a little moment, hold this posture before returning to your starting position.

Step 5

Using your abdominal/core muscles to support your spine, gently extend one hip (lift one leg) a few inches off the floor while elevating the opposing arm a few inches off the floor from your starting position. Maintain full extension in both your leg and arm, and prevent any rotation in either. Avoid any arching of your back or elevating of your head while maintaining your torso and head posture. For a little moment, hold this posture before returning to your starting position.

Bent knee push-up

Step 1

Kneel on an exercise mat or the floor with your feet together behind you in the starting position (see illustration).

Step 2

Slowly lean forward to lay your palms flat on the mat, with your hands shoulder-width apart and your fingers pointing forward. Repeat for the other side. Slowly transfer your weight forward until your shoulders are exactly over your hands, then reverse the process. Reposition your hands as necessary to ensure the complete extension of your body from the knees without any bending at the hips throughout the exercise. Contracting your core and abdominal muscles will help to firm up your torso (“bracing”).

Step 3

Slowly lower your body towards the floor while keeping a tight torso and head that are aligned with your spine. Downward Phase: During this downward phase, avoid allowing your low back to droop or your hips to rise over your heart level. Keeping your chest or chin in contact with the mat or floor, continue to lower yourself. Your elbows should either stay close to the sides of your body or gently extend outwards while you walk or run.

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Step 4

During the upward phase, you should maintain a solid torso and head that are aligned with your spine by pressing upwards via your arms. Allowing your low back to droop or your hips to rise upwards is not recommended. Hold the position for as long as it takes to completely extend the arms at the elbows.

Step 5

Push-ups put a strain on the wrist joints, which are prone to injury. Instead of placing your hands on the floor, you might use dumbbells and grab the handles instead of placing your hands on the floor to relieve some of the tension. The only time you need to lower yourself to the floor is when pressing from an elevated position, such with a dumbbell, in which case you should lower yourself until your chest or chin is level with the dumbbell handles.

Crunch

Crunch

Step 1

To begin, lie face down (on your back) on an exercise mat with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and heels 12 – 18 inches from the base of the spine.

Step 2

Holding your hands behind your head, squeeze your scapulae (shoulder blades) together and drawing your elbows back, without arching your low back, do this exercise. Throughout the workout, it is important to maintain the proper elbow posture. During the upward portion of the exercise, keep your head in alignment with your spine, but allow it to go into minor flexion (bringing the chin towards the chest) as needed.

Step 3

During the upward phase of the exercise, exhale, contract your abdominal and core muscles, and bring your chin slightly towards your chest while slowly curling your torso towards your thighs. Downward Phase: Exhale, contraction of your abdominal and core muscles, and flexing of your chin slightly towards your chest. When doing the action, be sure to concentrate on moving your rib cage towards your pelvis (the neck stays relaxed while the chin is tucked towards the neck). All of your feet, tailbone, and lower back should be in contact with the mat at all times throughout the exercise. Continue curling up until your upper back is raised off the mat. Repeat as necessary. Hold this posture for a limited period of time.

Step 4

During the downward phase, take a calm, deep breath and gently uncurl (lower) your torso back towards the mat in a controlled manner. Make sure that your feet, tailbone, and low back remain in touch with the mat.

It is critical to maintain proper form throughout this workout in order to avoid undue tension on your low back. Individuals often do this action too quickly, which causes the hip flexors to be recruited to aid with the upward part of the movement. This approach causes the pelvis to tilt anteriorly, increasing the amount of stress placed on the low back. It should be avoided at all costs. The abdominals are responsible for connecting the rib cage to the pelvis, thus the action should be focused on bringing these two body components closer together while maintaining the neck and shoulders as relaxed as possible.

Front plank

Step 1

Lie prone (on your stomach) on an exercise mat or the floor, with your elbows tight to your sides and directly beneath your shoulders, palms down and hands facing front. Finish in this position. Extend your legs by contracting your quadriceps, then dorsiflex your ankles by contracting your calf muscles (pull toes towards your shins). To tighten your torso, contract your core and abdominal muscles as hard as you can.

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Step 2

Phase of progress. Slowly raise your whole body off the floor or mat, keeping your torso and legs as rigid as possible. If possible, avoid arching (sagging) in your low back, hiking (upward) in your hips, or bending in your knees. Do not shrug or rotate your shoulders, and keep your shoulders positioned directly over your elbows with your palms facing down. Continue to take deep breaths while maintaining this posture for a predetermined amount of time (5 or more seconds).

Step 3

Downward Phase: Keeping your torso tight and your knees extended, carefully drop your body back towards the mat or the floor before resting.

If you encounter any discomfort in your low back while doing this action, stop immediately and talk with your doctor.

Squat jumps

Squat jumps

Step 1

Starting Position: Stand with your feet hip-width apart, arms by your sides, depressing and retracting your scapulae (pulling shoulders down and back) without arching your low back, and “brace” (engage your abdominal / core muscles) to stiffen your spine. Finishing Position: Stand with your feet hip-width apart, arms by your sides, depressing and retracting your scapulae (pulling shoulders down and back) without arching your low back,

Step 2

Begin your downhill phase by sliding your hips rearward and gently pushing your hips downwards to generate a hinge-like action at your knees. Downward Phase: Drop yourself till you can feel your heels lifting off the floor. Try to maintain a flat back by bending forward at the hips, keeping your head looking forward, and positioning your arms where they are most comfortable or where they will provide the maximum degree of support for your balance.

Step 3

With just a short pause at the bottom of your downward phase, burst upwards via your lower extremity, reaching triple extension. Jumping Movement: (pushing and extending your ankles, knees and hips simultaneously). When you leap into the air, make sure your feet are level with each other and parallel to the surface of the ground.

Step 4

Proper foot placement and preventing excessive forward movement in your lower extremities, which puts extra stress on your knees, are the most crucial components of the landing phase.

Step 5

Make an effort to land gently and silently on the mid-foot, with the heel of the foot moving rearward swiftly. In order to absorb the hitting forces connected with leaping, you should always press your hips backward and lower them to the ground. When landing, avoid locking out your knees or quadriceps, as this might result in possible knee injuries to the knee.

Step 6

Land with your trunk slightly forward, your head aligned with your spine, and your back firm or flat, as if you were jumping. Maintain the engagement of your abdominal / core muscles, tightening your body to protect your spine.

Step 7

Exercise Variation: As your jumping and landing abilities improve, you can increase the intensity and complexity of the exercise by doing one of the following: (1) driving your arms behind you during the downward phase (illustrated), (2) driving your arms forward and upward during the jumping phase (illustrated), or (3) driving your knees towards your chest during the jumping phase.

It is recommended that you first learn how to squat and land before trying to leap higher than 10 feet. Once you have mastered the hip-hinge mechanism, you may go to smaller leaps while paying close attention to your landing mechanics. Progress to more forceful leaps only when you have mastered the mechanics of landing on your feet.